Research With Impact

Donating blood or plasma
Johnson BusinessFeed

Left, right agree selling bodies is wrong – but reasons differ

Both liberals and conservatives consider bodily markets morally wrong, but they do so for different reasons, according to new research.

Watching videos on your devices
Johnson BusinessFeed

Pictures, videos can send viewers down a ‘rabbit hole’

How many cat videos can you watch in one sitting? Associate Professor Kaitlin Woolley ’12, says they’re like potato chips: You can’t consume just one.

The gears of a watch
Dyson BusinessFeed

Structured management protocols help firms thrive

Companies with highly structured management practices attract, keep top workers, and those with structured operations attract top-flight managers.

BookCover_Prasad2
Dyson BusinessFeed

The future of money

Professor Eswar Prasad examines the implications of the rise of digital currencies in newest book.

Online reviews, happy, satisfied, unhappy
Nolan School BusinessFeed

Driving more accurate reviews in hospitality

Research examines the relationship between customer satisfaction and reporting motivation in online review platforms.

chess pieces on a board
Johnson BusinessFeed

Lateral moves may ultimately benefit career trajectory, study

Professor Michael Waldman has found important links between lateral job moves in relation to promotions, wage dynamics, and education.

upper body photo of Jinhua Zhao
Dyson BusinessFeed

Meet Jinhua Zhao, Dyson’s new dean

Dean Zhao believes Dyson is positioned to push the frontiers of business education to address 21st century challenges. Learn why and more in this Q&A.

an image of a bright red clock on a yellow background
Nolan School BusinessFeed

Study examines if US firms are becoming more short-term oriented

Yuan Shi has found intriguing data that provides new details around the active debate among managers, investors, researchers, and policymakers.

the words self esteem unwrapped in paper
Johnson BusinessFeed

Low self-esteem leads to low-quality purchases

Study proposes that low self-esteem consumers gravitate toward inferior products because those products confirm their pessimistic self-views.